defining holistic

Defining Holistic

If you’ve ever stepped into a health food store you’ve been bombarded with the word, “holistic,” but do you know what it really means?

Simply put: holistic health means that wellness comes from the sum of all interconnected parts. These parts are not just our organs—but also our minds, our environments, our food, our experience, life. I like the phrase holistic because it acknowledges the fact that every part of our life affects our wellness. That sandwich you just ate, the stranger you just talked to, the fresh air that just blasted through your apartment window—all of these sums directly affect the whole, and directly affect how you feel.

I spent most of my life being reduced to parts by traditional medicine. I was treated for my symptoms and misdiagnosed over and over again because doctors failed to see the underlying cause behind all of my problems: my gut was failing me. Had they looked at my gut they would have seen that all of my issues were a direct result of its poor health.

My doctor always says, “the gut is the gateway to all disease.” It’s so true. If you’re experiencing a health problem, look first at your gut—if it’s off, everything is off.

Once I was finally diagnosed with celiac, I was thrilled! Disease or not, I had an answer, and now it was time to figure out how this autoimmune disease was affecting all different parts of my body. I began to view my health holistically and find the connections.

So that’s what I’d like to do here, in the Feel Free section of my website—help you find connections and think of your wellness on the whole. It’s a never-ending journey we can take together—a path towards feeling good and living free.

Be Well,

Jennifer Esposito

Share this post

Comments (9)

  • Michele Reply

    My name is Michele and I was diagnosed with celiac disease one month ago. It was a dermatologist who finally was unable to determine what was wrong with me and for that I am eternally thankful.
    Like you Jennifer I had misdiagnosis after misdiagnosis. My GP referred me to a psychologist. I saw gastrologists who told me I had IBS and tried to put me on medication. The journey has been really challenging especially when everyone thought my symptoms were in my head.
    My blood work is currently a disaster so I now take a liquid vitamin D, I take iron seeing my count was alarmingly low, a digestive enzyme to help me break down food and a probiotic.
    I can’t tell you at how shocked I am at how much better I feel after one month. While I still have bad days I actually gave more energy then I’ve had in years.
    When I think back at how I was made to feel trying to get answers from doctors I still have anxiety but I know time will heal those fears. Persistence is what finally gave me the answers I needed. We need to be our own advocates and being insistent is what finally got me the answers I was looking for.
    I want anyone who reads this to know it will get better. It takes 9 months for gluten to clear out of your system so I’m excited what the future has to hold.
    Thank you Jennifer for sharing your story for its helped me to begin my physical and emotional healing.

    September 11, 2016 at 11:32 pm
  • Amanda McClellan Reply

    How were you diagnosed? I would love to find an answer. I have all of those symptoms. I cannot seem to find any doctor that thinks I could even have an allergy to gluten. I have hypothyroidism, low iron, low vitamin d , heavy periods with fibroids, stomach aches after I eat, bloating, IBS, skin rashes, acne rosacea, thinning hair and I’m purely exhausted. I’ve gained weight has because I can’t even stay up when I get home from work. Anything you can recommend would help. I just want to know what’s wrong.

    September 27, 2016 at 10:59 pm
    • Janet Reply

      Amanda ask to be tested for Hashimotos Thyroiditis that may give you some answers too.

      October 6, 2016 at 7:47 pm
      • http://www./ Reply

        Thank you Jessica. Love your message. Thank you Jesus! Help us to show your love and mercy to pthers, especially to those little ones that you have given us!!

        December 29, 2016 at 10:56 pm
    • Michele Reply

      You can have blood work done. Immunology is what it’s called. I also had a biopsy done on a piece of my skin where my rash was. The best way to get a diagnosis is being scoped where they do a tiny biopsy on your intestine.
      So…it takes 9 months for gluten leave your body and some time for healing. You’ll have good days and bad. It is an auto immune disease so ups and downs are to be expected even if you are gluten free.
      My advice go gluten free.

      October 19, 2016 at 1:45 am
  • Skye Reply

    Thank you Jennifer and both of the replies have also helped.

    September 29, 2016 at 2:39 pm
  • LYNETTE SMITH Reply

    I WAS WATCH BLUE BLOODS LAST NIGHT AND JUST HAPPEN TO GOOGLE JENNIFER….WAS SO INTERESTING TO FIND OUT THAT YOU ALSO HAVE CELIAC , A WEBSITE AND BAKERY. I WAS THRILLED TO SEE ALL THE INFORMATION YOU HAVE POSTED. I WAS DIAGNOSED ABOUT 7 YEARS AGO NOW, AND AM STILL STRUGGLING WITH MANY HEALTH ISSUES. HOPEFULLY THE INFORMATION YOU SHARE WILL HELP ALOT. WOULD LOVE TO VISIT YOUR BAKER SOMETIME!!!

    October 7, 2016 at 9:10 am
  • Marilyn Reply

    Hi Jennifer,
    If you could, it would help to know what you’re blood numbers were on the IGg test. My first test came out 1.13 (with <.90 being the range according to KP that Celiac is diagnosed). So I cut out a lot of 'wheat' products, the major offenders. Whole wheat seemed to be more damaging to me that just the weak so called wheat(white) flour they put in things. So I was still getting some 'gluten'. However I am trying to understand why, when I went back to get retested 8 mos later, my IGg blood result INCREASED to 1.55 after I clearly reduced my gluten intake by 80%. I rejected the endoscopy because all that does is confirm what I already knew (why risk the procedure & costs–I have Celiac). And I had symptoms of bad bloating! And I have the DH elbow rash. I am feeling much better now and skin is doing better (& allergy to things) but doesn't it seem strange why the IGg would increase? If you have any info on why please share that. I get that they teach Celiac=100% gluten free diet but I think more of Celiac= symptom abatement. Do you have info on the relationship between IGg & IGa? Even though my IGa increased a bit as well it is still way below the range limit. Thank you.

    November 18, 2016 at 2:28 pm
  • Debra Weed-Pond Reply

    4 Years after having a3rd of my stomach removed I was still having lots of troubles and then I finally was told I have Celiac’s and cronhs , a year later I’m still reading and learning to live gluten free … Your book Jennifer’s Way made me feel not so alone and crazy … Oh I’m 60 years young , breaking my bad habits wasn’t that hard except I can’t give up my coffee….

    December 6, 2016 at 1:08 am

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *